Tips & News

Healthy ergonomics and getting wealthy

Money magazine recently published a brief article on the benefits of adjusting your chair to achieve maximum comfort, and “wealth.”  As part of their Get Healthy, Get Wealthy series, they suggest that basic ergonomics, including optimally adjusted chairs and practicing good posture can improve comfort and happiness – which can lead to wealth. I’m not […]

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Staying pain-free and healthy with good ergonomics

In 1964, the ideal weight (according to the Hamwi formula) for someone 5’ 10” was 165.3 pounds. In 1983, the ideal weight (based on the Robinson formula) for the same height person was 156.5 pounds. Today, the CDC sites a range of 128.9 to 174.2 pounds. Why the history lesson… because we… humans are a […]

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People are Healthier When They Fidget

Recently, the American Council on Science and Health found that “any type of movement (even fidgeting) can be beneficial for one’s health.”  The study of 12,000+ British women aged 37 to 78 (published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine) suggests that fidgeting may “reduce some of the negative health effects” of sitting for long […]

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Texting (and using a tablet) can place up to 60 lbs of stress on your neck

Excessive use of a smartphone (and similarly a tablet, magazine, and book) could produce considerable stress on the cervical spine and therefore cause neck pain. Findings from multiple studies have concluded that “heavy smartphone users are commonly found to have forward head syndrome, and slouched posture.”  The distribution of musculoskeletal symptoms included headaches, neck pain, […]

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Modern day keying and typing: Using best practices of the past to improve posture and prevent injury

In 1946 Stella Pajunas set the world typing record on an electric typewriter at 216 words per minute (wpm), and in 1959, Carole Bechen established the manual typewriter record at 176 wpm.  Although still fast, modern keyboards can’t match these early records where the fastest “modern keyboarder” is Gregory Arakelian who typed 158 wpm in […]

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Smartwatch Ergonomics and Other Safety Concerns

The launch of the Apple watch garnered much press and interest, but smartwatches, including those made by Asus, LG, Microsoft, Motorola, Pebble, Samsung, Sony, and others bring a new set of ergonomic and safety challenges. Here are a few common sense approaches to smartwatch ergonomics and safety: Do not check your texts or perform other […]

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Tablet Use and Neck Muscles

Recent research at Washington State University identified a greater incidence of neck muscle strain while using a tablet compared to sitting with the head in a neutral position.  Participants were tested in multiple positions while reading and typing for 2 to 5 minutes. They study was designed to help evaluate head and neck “biomechanics during […]

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Walking Three Days a Week – Super Gains in Health and Happiness

Recently, researchers at the University of Birmingham and other universities recruited sedentary office workers advising them that they would be participating in a study by walking 30 minutes during their usual lunch hour, three times a week.  The study, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, contained 56 participants (mostly middle-aged […]

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6 Months of Endurance Training can Reverse 30 Years of Aging

My Dad owned a 1966 Dodge Charger with a 426 Hemi.  As a child, I remember fondly being “pinned” to the back seat during hard acceleration.  And for safety, my Dad always had us wear our seatbelts. That same year of the Dodge Charger (1966), researchers from the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas, […]

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Healthy Ergonomics for Touch-screen Tablets and Smartphones

In a study by Harvard School of Public Health, experienced tablet users completed a series of tasks using two types of touch-screen tablets.  Each had a case that with adjustments that allowed for the units to adjust for tilt and be propped up.  The findings reveal some simple, yet effective opportunities for healthy ergonomics. Tablets, […]

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